How to start an essay

1. Format

  • Typed – use a word processor (such as Microsoft Word) on a computer.
  • Spacing – the space between lines on the page is typically double-space. However, it may be changing. (I now prefer single-spaced myself.)
  • Font size – standard size of the text is usually 12-point.
  • Font style – standard font, such as Times New Roman.

4. Style & Punctuation

Overall, the paper should demonstrate a command of the writing process and the author’s care in crafting it. Avoid errors of spelling, punctuation, grammar, sentence structure, verb tense, and vocabulary, such as the following:

  1. Put punctuation inside quotations (for American writing). If you put something in quotations that is immediately followed by punctuation (such as commas or colons), then put the punctuation mark inside the last quotation mark.Correct: John Doe claims that, “Britney Spears is a tool.”Incorrect: John Doe claims that, “Britney Spears is a tool”.Another example: “I’m in love with Space Ghost,” Bjork proclaimed.

    (Note: I know this rule doesn’t seem right. The British style of writing has the punctuation outside the quotation marks, which makes more sense. However, the American style requires that you write it the other way.)

  2. Put parenthetical citations outside of quotations. Correct: “Blah, blah, blah, this is a quote” (Author 32).Incorrect: “Blah, blah, blah, this is a quote (Author 32).”
  3. Introduce quotes. Introduce quotes, preferably by acknowledging who is saying it.Example: In the article “War Without End,” John Doe says, “…blah, blah, and blah” (36).

    Notice the three dots in the quote (…), which is called an elipses. You’re supposed to put those in when you are not quoting the whole sentence. It denotes that something came before (or after) the part of the sentence you are quoting.

  4. Generally, spell out numbers. For example, write ‘three,’ not ‘3.’ Exceptions can be made for larger numbers, like 1089, especially when you are simply making reference to a numeral.
  5. Avoid informal abbreviations and notations. For example, don’t write ‘&’ for ‘and’ or ‘b/c’ for ‘because.’ However, there are notations and abbreviations that are conventions in professional writing; for example: ‘e.g.’ is often used for ‘for example’ and ‘etc.’ for ‘et cetera’ and ‘p.’ for ‘page.’ However, for this last one, note that it is only used in citing sources or references, not in other sentences. So, for example, don’t write “The p. had many words of wisdom written on it.”
  6. Use versus mention. In general, when you mention (or talk about) rather than use a word you should put quotes (single or double) around the word. This is not necessary when you use a word.Incorrect: John contains the letter h.Correct: ‘John’ contains the letter ‘h.’(Note: Some people simply italicize the word to indicate mention. I follow this convention here sometimes so that it is easier to read. However, it can get confused with emphasis, which is what italics are more commonly used for. Also, the standard for use-mention indication is not exactly clear. Most people use quotes and use single quotes for British style and double quotes for American style. I tend to use single quotes just to distinguish them from quoting what someone has said.)
  7. Write well and consider your reader! Good writing keeps the reader’s perspective in mind. It takes work to read someone’s ideas. You owe it to your readers to explain your ideas clearly and ideally in a pleasing manner. To become a better writer in terms of style, read widely and find good writers to emulate (some excellent non-fiction writers that come to mind: Paul Bloom, Rebecca Goldstein, and Steven Pinker).
  8. Recognize the Flexibility of Writing Rules. You’ll notice that skilled writers don’t always follow all the “rules” for writing. They know that the rules are somewhat flexible and can even be explicitly broken for good effect at times. You might be able to get away with the same, but it’s good to practice working well within them for graded papers!
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5. Common Grammatical Errors to Avoid

  1. Misusing i.e. and e.g. Do not confuse these two. They do not mean the same thing!i.e. = that ise.g. = for example

    (Many people think that ‘i.e’ stands for ‘in example.’ That is false. Both are abbreviations for two different latin phrases.)

  2. Using ‘if’ when you should use ‘whether’. Incorrect: I do not know if this is true.Correct: I do not know whether this is true.Correct: If this is true, then you are wrong.
  3. Confusing ‘there’ with ‘their.’ ‘Their’ indicates possession, ‘there’ does not.Incorrect: There problem was a lack of courage.Correct: Their problem was a lack of courage.Incorrect: Their are a lot of problems here.Correct: There are a lot of problems here.
  4. Misconnecting verbs. Incorrect: We should try and change the law.Correct: We should try to change the law.
  5. Letting your accent get in the way of things. Incorrect: Mind and brain are one in the same thing.Correct: Mind and brain are one and the same thing.Incorrect: Socrates should of fought.Correct: Socrates should have fought.
  6. Improper form of the plural possessive of names. Incorrect: Descarte’s problem was ….Incorrect: Descartes problem was….Correct: Descartes’ problem was….Correct: Descartes’s problem was….(Note: Either of the last two is acceptable only for names ending in ‘s’ like ‘Descartes’ or ‘Jesus.’ Otherwise, always go with the last example–i.e., add an apostrophe and an ‘s.’ The convention is usaully to not add an extra ‘s’ for old names, such as ‘Descartes’ and ‘Jesus.’ So, to say that this is the book that Rawls owns, people often write: “This is Rawls’s book.”)
  7. Improper use of semi-colons. Incorrect: The following will be on the test; Locke, Hume, Parfit.Incorrect: Although there is no right answer; there are many wrong answers.Correct: There is no right answer; there are many wrong answers.(The Rule: Use a semi-colon only where you could use a period instead. In other words, a semi-colon must join two clauses that could stand by themselves as complete sentences. The semi-colin is just used to indicate that the two sentences are connected or intimately related.)
  8. Confusing ‘then’ and ‘than’. Incorrect: If this is true, than I’m a fool.Incorrect: I am more of a fool then you are.Correct: If this is true, then I’m a fool.Correct: I am more of a fool than you are.
  9. Its versus it’s.Incorrect: Its easy to make this mistake.Incorrect: It’s pages are crumbling.Correct: It’s easy to make this mistake.Correct: Its pages are crumbling.
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(Note: partly adapted from Pasnau’s Top 10 Writing Errors)

6. Humorous Writing Guidelines

  1. Be more or less specific.
  2. Use not bad grammars.
  3. Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.
  4. Don’t use no double negatives.
  5. Avoid tumbling off the cliff of triteness into the dark abyss of overused metaphors.
  6. Take care that your verb and your subject is in agreement.
  7. No sentence fragments.
  8. Placing a comma between subject and predicate, is not correct.
  9. Who needs rhetorical questions?
  10. Use the apostrophe in it’s proper place.
  11. Avoid colloquial stuff, like totally.
  12. Avoid those run-on sentences you know the ones they stop and then start again they should be separated with semicolons.
  13. The passive voice should be used infrequently.
  14. And avoid starting sentences with a conjunction.
  15. Excessive use of exclamation points can be disastrous!!!!
  16. Exaggeration is a million times worse than understatement.
  17. Stamp out and eliminate redundancy because, if you reread your work, you will find on rereading that a great deal of repetition can be avoided by rereading and editing, so reread your work and improve it by editing out the repetition you noticed during the rereading.
  18. It’s incumbent on one to employ the vernacular and eschew archaisms.
  19. It’s not O.K. to use ampersands & informal abbreviations.
  20. Parenthetical remarks (however relevant) are usually (but not always) an obstacle for readers (and make it harder on readers even if you’re being careful).

(author unkown)

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