How to make a hot toddy

Classic Hot Toddy Recipe

Well, we made it through the great blizzard and despite getting two feet of snow we were thankfully able to keep our power and even get a little outside playtime in! I posted updates on Facebook and Instagram as the storm progressed:

Unfortunately the entire family woke up feeling a bit under the weather yesterday.  Sore throats all around-for the husband and myself I whipped up a nice warm Hot Toddy to help clear our throats (the kids got whiskey free versions!) I thought I’d share my recipe with you in case anyone else is feeling the effects of the weather!

Instructions:

In a small saucepan, heat the apple cider until simmering and remove from heat.  Add remaining ingredients to a cup and pour hot cider over the top.  Stir until the honey is dissolved, sip and enjoy!

Print A classic hot toddy made with apple cider can be the perfect thing to warm you up in the winter-and they say it can help you get over a cold sooner!

  • Author: The Happier Homemaker
  • Category: Drinks
  • Cuisine: American
  • 4 oz apple cider
  • 1.5 oz whiskey
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1 lemon slice
  1. In a small saucepan, heat the apple cider until simmering and remove from heat.
  2. Add remaining ingredients to a cup and pour hot cider over the top.
  3. Stir until the honey is dissolved, sip and enjoy!

We’re going on a cruise this weekend so I was happy to wake up this morning already feeling on the mend.

Were you affected by the blizzard? It sure was an experience!

When Do You Need a Hot Toddy?

Hot Toddies are a great answer if you’re coming down with the flu or a cold, which, chances are, is why you’ve googled Hot Toddies in the first place.

Related text  How to make a pdf fillable

For starters, here’s a handy little guide to differentiate the flu from a cold.

The flu comes on quickly and has you aching all over, giving you chills and sweats, and is accompanied by fever. Conversely, a cold is not as quick to set in (though it goes away quicker), will rarely result in a fever, at least in adults, and won’t hurt as much. On a similar note, a cold lasts shorter and the symptoms are typically not as severe, so you can function more or less as usual. Still, you should keep in mind that you’re contagious for the first three days, so staying put and keeping yourself well-rested is not beneficial for you, but for others as well.

Both the flu and a cold, however, will have you sneezing, coughing (dry or gunky, respectively) and wiping your nose until it’s all red and sore. Both will also close down your throat, making eating anything more solid than soup an ordeal.

All of that said, though, despite feeling miserable and achy all-over, you don’t have to alarm your GP on account of either the flu or a cold. More often than not, your body will heal itself, and all you need to do is help it by resting a lot and keeping yourself warm and comfy.

Like this post? Please share to your friends: