How to draw a flower easy

We’re weeks away from the start of spring and, of course, mother nature decides to drop a big load of sn*w (hey, it’s a four-letter word in Minnesota by March) all over us. Despite the messy inconvenience, I can still gear myself up for the spring season in my bullet journal by drawing flower doodles.

Drawing flowers is one of my favorite ways to decorate my bullet journal spreads. As evidenced by social media, a lot of other people love decorating their bullet journals with flowers as well!

Well, I’m no expert artist, and for a long time, I actually avoided drawing flowers in my bullet journal because I never liked the way they turned out. Sometimes they looked too cartoony. Other times, the proportions and layout wouldn’t pan out the way it did in my head.

Right around the time I started Planning Mindfully, I followed this amazing woman named Liz on Instagram. Liz runs @bonjournal_ and she keeps a very lovely feed full of bullet journal goodness.

Liz is absolutely incredible at drawing sophisticated flowers. What makes Liz extra special, however, is her ability to break down her flower drawings into super easy steps. It’s no wonder she’s so popular because she’s been able to inspire so many artists and bullet journal accounts alike.

She has 105,000 followers on Instagram… she’s THAT good. Everybody loves her beautiful flowers and simple instructional posts! It’s a large reason why she’s one of the 18 most inspirational bullet journal accounts of 2018!

With spring around the corner, I knew I had to ask Liz if I could share her amazing work with all of you! And thankfully, she said yes!

Flower doodles are beautiful and add creative flaire to literally any bullet journal! Thankfully my friend Liz at @bonjournal_ on Instagram shows they are easy to draw and provides tons of ideas and inspiration with her flower doodle tutorial posts. Make your bujo super pretty!

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A Little About Liz of @bonjournal_

Since much of her Instagram feed is either floral bullet journal posts or ‘how-to-draw’ flower tutorials, I asked her a little bit about why she focuses on these two particular themes. Here is what she had to share!

From Liz-Some of my best childhood memories are watching my grandmother paint. She was extremely talented and could paint landscapes and portraits, but her favorite thing to paint was watercolor flowers. This may explain my passion for drawing flowers!

I’ve been drawing since I was little, but these days, the opportunity to sit down and be a real artist are few and far between. That’s why I’ve incorporated flower art into my bullet journal – it serves me both as a planner and a creative outlet.

Flower doodles are beautiful and add creative flaire to literally any bullet journal! Thankfully my friend Liz at @bonjournal_ on Instagram shows they are easy to draw and provides tons of ideas and inspiration with her flower doodle tutorial posts. Make your bujo super pretty!

Art brings me so much joy, and after joining the Bullet Journal community on Instagram, it seemed like there were so many others that wanted to use their journals in a similar way. Hence – the flower tutorials! The best part about creating the “How-to-draw” series (and the main reason that I continue posting) is all of the amazing comments and messages that I get.

A mother once messaged me to tell me that she and her daughter do my tutorials together every week. Others say that they never thought they could draw a stick figure, much less a beautiful flower!

I’m so happy to be able to give back to everyone in this way – I love seeing everyone’s beautiful results (tag me, use #bonjournal, or message me!). And of course, I’m always taking requests!

And if you’d like to follow Liz, you will find her at @bonjournal on Instagram, Facebook, and on Youtube!

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For now, let’s get to drawing!

Putting Multiple Flowers Together

So you have drawing individual flowers down, which is amazing! You may want to create floral banners or bouquets in your bullet journal spreads. While the concepts of drawing the flowers are relatively similar, there are some key differences in how to lay out the flowers next to each other.

How to Draw a Bunch of Flowers

Flower doodles are beautiful and add creative flaire to literally any bullet journal! Thankfully my friend Liz at @bonjournal_ on Instagram shows they are easy to draw and provides tons of ideas and inspiration with her flower doodle tutorial posts. Make your bujo super pretty!

  1. Sketch out guides for placing your flowers. I usually choose one big flower in the corner and two smaller ones off to the sides.
  2. Draw the main flower so that it is facing outwards towards you.
  3. The side flowers will face outwards, as if you’re looking at the flower from the side. Start with a “bowel” shape petal, and fill in petals around it. Repeat with other flower.
  4. Finish your drawing by adding leaves and other details!

While this is geared toward corners of pages, the concept is relatively simple to grasp and you could do bunches on any part of a page.

How to Draw a Bouquet

Flower doodles are beautiful and add creative flaire to literally any bullet journal! Thankfully my friend Liz at @bonjournal_ on Instagram shows they are easy to draw and provides tons of ideas and inspiration with her flower doodle tutorial posts. Make your bujo super pretty!

  1. Start with your guides in pencil. Choose the shape of your bouquet, then fill in the guide circle with random, smaller circles of varying sizes.
  2. Fill in the inner circles with any type of flower.
  3. Add stems and leaves. Make all stems intersect at a given point and fan out below.
  4. Detail! Fill in with smaller leaves, buds, etc… use delicate lines to add dimension to the petals. If you’d like, you can add a bow!

Drawing a flower 101….

I use these black Sharpies for everything and let my kids use them too.  Introduce them as a special and adult art supply and your kids will treat them as such!  Start by instructing your kiddos to draw a variety of sizes of circles all across the paper.  Aim for about the half way line, circles above and below.

Use your markers to draw another circle around each circle so they are double decker circles.  Vary line thickness by tracing over some lines more than once.

Make drawing a flower easy with this directed drawing exercise. All students will draw a flower with the same directions end up with a unique work of art.

Directed drawing step three….

Add a border to each flower.  Outside the two concentric circles we started with add a design to each flower.  These can be as simple as lines, dots, dashes, triangles, rectangles.  It’s fun to show kids a design that seems super complicated and help them see how it breaks down into a series of simple lines or shapes that are repeated.  If kids get stuck on this step of their flower drawing suggest they mimic the shapes inside the flower and repeat them on the outside.

Make drawing a flower easy with this directed drawing exercise. All students will draw a flower with the same directions end up with a unique work of art.

Drawing a flower with foliage…

Add simple stems by adding two straight lines.  These are big flowers and they need sturdy stems to hold them up, right?  Leaves are a simple football shape.  The leaves that are lowest on the page will be in front, closest to the viewer.  Leaves in the back are overlapped by leaves in the front.   Make a mistake?  Make it a doodle that is part of the design.  

Encourage kids to trace over lines to vary the thickness to add interest.

Make drawing a flower easy with this directed drawing exercise. All students will draw a flower with the same directions end up with a unique work of art.

Drawing a flower wasn’t so hard….

What I love about these directed drawings is that it takes the scrainess out of drawing.  A kid doesn’t have to think about all the pieces and parts and filling the entire paper.  Directed drawing means one step at a time which can be a game changer for a lot of kids.

I also love the fact that directed drawing takes a complex subject and breaks it down into a series of recognizable parts.  The point isn’t necessarily to get really good at following directions but to help kids see that even complex things can be drawn by looking at them as simpler shapes that make them up.

That’s it.  This is an easy, one sitting lesson that will give kids some ideas and skills they are sure to be able to apply to their future projects!

Make drawing a flower easy with this directed drawing exercise. All students will draw a flower with the same directions end up with a unique work of art.

Here is a helpful hint that may make drawing flowers easier for you. Memorize this theory, and use it with everything you draw.

We all know that the preliminary sketch you create is made up of lines. (I call this an accurate line drawing.) It’s the foundation of your piece on which you build your rendering. But, each of those lines needs to be turned into an edge, so it doesn’t look outlined like a cartoon. To do this, remember what a line really is: merely a separation of two different surfaces. The line you drew is telling you that these surfaces are either touching or overlapping. To make the line you drew turn into an edge, there’s a pretty simple solution:

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First, analyze your reference and look for the five elements of shading. This will tell you where the light source is and the cast shadows are.

How to draw flowers in graphite

Even in graphite, you can see the theory of “light over dark” and “dark over light” at work in the edges of these flower petals.

Second, identify in your reference which surfaces are dark and which are light. Now look at the darkness of the line you drew in your sketch. Which surface does the darkness of that line belong to? Is it part of a shadow below the surface? If so, you must blend out the darkness of that line into that area. Is the surface you’re drawing darker than the background? Then blend the darkness of the line into that surface.

As you work, analyze all of the edges in your photo reference, and ask yourself: Is it light over dark or is it dark over light? Then, blend the darkness of your drawn line into whichever surface it belongs. Make sure it fades out gradually and completely. Voila! It’s an edge, not an outline!

Studying your edges is critical, especially since they can change. Don’t let them fool you. The edge of a single flower petal may appear light against dark in one area, and then switch suddenly to dark over light. Don’t try to draw edges without close observation, or you may miss some very important tonal changes.

I know this may sound difficult, but practice, practice and practice some more. Soon it’ll become second nature to analyze every line drawn. Study my examples here, and look for the beauty of edges in these florals. I think you’ll find that drawing flowers will make you happy too!

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Have a wonderful week everyone!Lee

Edited by Cherie Haas, online editor of ArtistsNetwork.com

Lee Hammond has been called the Queen of Drawing. That may not be fair these days, since in addition to providing the best drawing lessons, she has also created fantastic books and videos filled with the same easy to follow acrylic painting techniques, colored pencil techniques and more. Click here to see all of the instructional books and DVDs that Lee Hammond has to offer!

Free download! Easy Acrylic Painting Techniques by Lee Hammond

How to Draw a Rose Flower Easy?

Rose and other flowers an incredible subject for novice artists and experienced artists alike. Their symmetrically set highlights make for a fun exercise-whether it be design work or an activity to figure out how to compare covering shapes.

Here, we’ll make you learn how to draw a rose flower easy but before that have a look on the things which is required to draw a rose flower –

What will you require

  • You need a hard pencil (HB) to draw

  • A medium soft pencil (2B or it can be slightly lower)

  • A soft pencil (5B or lower)

  • A paper sheet

  • Eraser

  • Pencil sharpener

Now, check out the to draw a rose flower easy –

You can begin by drawing a tear/egg shape with a hard pencil. Make sure to use light lines. This will be the inward bud of the rose.

Now you need to draw the “opening” of this shape.

You need to add a touch of little petals inside.

Now you need to close those petals into a heart shape—this will be the silhouette of different petals.

Associate the outline with the remains of the bud, making a petal shape.

One more heart appended to the bud.

Once again draw the heart shape, yet this time make it not so much general but rather more open. The lines interfacing it with the bud will make an impact of depth in the event that you lead them effectively.

We require one more petal on this level. It will have a more confounded viewpoint, so you need to look carefully.

We have to put the bud inside a “container” of petals. To begin with make it out of little petals… at that point utilize bigger ones.

Whatever remains of the petals should twist increasingly down.

When you’re set, press harder over the lines you need to see better to draw out the last shape.

Take a milder pencil and shade the inward parts of the rose. To begin with draw lightly…. at that point press harder to accomplish a darker shade.

Utilize a similar pencil to marginally stress a few edges of the petals. Try not to draw all over them!

 step by step instructions to add dull shades to white rose

Backpedal to a hard pencil and utilize it to add an unobtrusive texture to the lit up parts.

Now you need to use the softest pencil and complete the process of shading with it, placing it in the darkest hole.

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